Staff

Dr. David Anderson is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Political and Cultural Studies at Swansea University where he is Program Director of American Studies. His research interests cover the history and culture of the American South in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century and the American Civil War, particularly soldier experience. He has published in the Journal of Southern History and Civil War History and is currently revising a monograph on American Civil War memory. More info….

Dr. Rebecca Clifford was part of an international team of fourteen historians from eight countries, funded by the AHRC and the Leverhulme Trust, who conducted the largest study of 1968 in Europe to date (Europe’s 1968: Voices of Revolt, OUP 2013). Her monograph, Commemorating the Holocaust: The Dilemmas of Remembrance in France and Italy (OUP 2013) is the first comparative study of official Holocaust commemorations in Europe.  More info…

Dr. Jonathan Dunnage (Associate Professor of Modern European History, Swansea University)
I teach European fascism and the history of crime, policing and punishment at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. My research focuses on the history of policing in modern Italy, though I am more generally interested in European police forces in the twentieth century. I recently undertook a project on policemen serving under the fascist dictatorship, which resulted in a monograph, Mussolini’s Policemen: Behaviour, Ideology and Institutional Culture in Representation and Practice, published by Manchester University Press in 2012. I am currently carrying out a case study of Italian post-war police culture as part of a broader quest to understand more about how dictatorial pasts influence the manner in which police forces rebuild their internal culture during periods of transition to democracy. As part of future CRAM initiatives, with Chris Millington I am currently planning a bid to the AHRC to fund a multi-disciplinary international research network on police culture.  More info…

Dr. Steven Gray is a specialist in imperial and naval history. He is particularly interested in the connections between British imperial, maritime, transnational, global and transoceanic history. His research currently concerns the material infrastructures of imperial and global networks in Pax Britannica, and how these facilitated the mobility of goods, people, militaries and empires. He completed his PhD at Warwick University in collaboration with the National Maritime Museum, and funded by the AHRC. This looked at how the expansion of a steam-powered Royal Navy in the second half of the nineteenth century had wider ramifications across the British empire. Steam propulsion made vessels less subject to the vagaries of tides, winds and currents, but it also made them utterly dependent on a particular resource – coal – and its distribution around the world. His research assesses how this created geopolitical tensions, required large infrastructures, as well as labour forces, and also engendered cultural connections around the globe. More info…

Dr. Richard Hall is a Colonial American specialist and lecturer in History at Swansea University whose recently completed PhD thesis examined the failed ‘Braddock expedition’ of 1755. His current research surrounds the use of psychological warfare by Native American and French-Canadian irregulars and the impact this had on conventionally trained British soldiers deployed to fight in North America during the 1755-1763 period. His research also examines how the French and Indian War exacerbated the competing visions of empire that, in the 1770s, would lead to the rupture between Britain and the thirteen colonies that would become the United States of America. More info…

Dr. Gregory Herman is a Tutor in French Language and Culture at Swansea University.  Prior to taking up this post, he studied principally at the University of Aberdeen, where he obtained an MA (Hons) and PhD in French studies, and an MLitt in Comparative Literature and Thought.  Dr Herman’s main research interests lie in the field of Second World War French literature and testimony and in particular the works of Jorge Semprun and Robert Antelme. In addition to memory studies, other areas of interest include contemporary French cinema and the writings of Roland Barthes and Maurice Blanchot. More info…

Dr. Tomás Irish is Lecturer in Modern History at Swansea University. He is a cultural historian of the First World War with a particular interest in university and intellectual history. He is the author of The University at War 1914-25: Britain, France, and the United States (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), and Trinity in War and Revolution 1912-23 (Dublin: Royal Irish Academy Press, 2015).  More info….

Dr. Leighton James has published two monographs (Witnessing the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars in German Central Europe, 1792-1815 (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2013) and The Politics of Identity and Civil Society: Miners in the Ruhr and South Wales, 1890 to 1926 (Manchester: MUP, 2008). He is currently Principal Investigator for a collaborative HERA funding project entitled, Making War, Mapping Europe: Militarized Cultural Encounters, 1792-1920.  More info…

Dr. Christoph Laucht researches Cold War and nuclear history. He has published a major research project on British nuclear culture as Elemental Germans: Klaus Fuchs, Rudolf Peierls and the Making of British Nuclear Culture, 1939-59 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012). He is a member of the editorial staff and book review editor for H-Soz-und-Kult, the German affiliate website of H-Net. Dr Laucht also belongs to the Research Network ‘Writing Pugwash Histories’ of the Universities of Sheffield, Sterling (both UK) and Vienna (Austria) and the German Association for Historical Peace Research. More info…

Dr. Eugene Miakinkov is a Russian specialist and lecturer on the War and Society programme in the Department of Political and Cultural Studies at Swansea University. Eugene is from Canada and went to the University of Alberta for his doctoral studies. His major fields are Russian history, diplomatic history of Europe, and the history of military thought. His PhD research examined the emergence of military culture in 18th century Russia during the reign of Catherine II and his current research centres on modern Russia and the militarization of culture under President Vladimir Putin. More info…

Dr. Chris Millington is currently conducting a major research project on political violence in interwar France, previously funded by a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship. His previous project on French veterans of the Great War was funded by the AHRC and the Institute of Historical Research’s Scouloudi Fellowship. It was published in 2012 as From Victory to Vichy: Veterans in Inter-war France (MUP, 2012). Dr Millington is also author of, with Brian Jenkins, France and Fascism: February 1934 and the Dynamics of Political Crisis (Routledge, 2015).  He is co-convenor of Cardiff-Swansea French History Seminar Series.  More info…

Dr. Nigel Pollard is a historian and archaeologist of the Roman world with extensive experience of fieldwork in the Mediterranean and Middle East and publications including the monograph Soldiers, Cities and Civilians in Roman Syria (University of Michigan Press 2000). The primary focus of his current research is the treatment and reception of archaeological sites during the Second World War – protection, damage, uses and protection – and the applicability of wartime lessons to contemporary policy and practice in cultural property protection in conflict zones.  More info…

Dr. Luca Trenta is a Lecturer in International Relations at Swansea University. Dr Trenta’s main interests lie in US foreign policy and Presidential decision-making. His monograph Risk and Presidential decision-making will be published by Routledge in 2015. He has published articles on the Carter and Clinton Administrations. His current project looks at US practices of targeted killings and assassinations both during the Cold War and in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks. The projects aims at uncovering continuities and changes in such practices with particular attention to the techniques used and to the actors and organizations involved. In collaboration with the Bush School he is also working on a separate project on the effectiveness of drones. More info…

Prof. Kevin Williams has written widely about international journalism, war and conflict– his publications include War and Peace News (OUP, 1985) and The Fog of War: media-military relations on the battlefield (Heinemann, 1987) and he was part of a team which produced the first piece of independent social science research for the British Military of Defence published under the title Military-Media-Government Relations at times of Armed Conflict. Report commissioned by the Ministry of Defence. Vol I The Falklands Conflict, Vol II Other People’s Conflict (House of Commons Library, 1986). His most recent publication is International Journalism (Sage, 2011).  More info…

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